Sunday, November 8, 2009

When winter arrives

break out the glühwein.

Doesn't that look like a great place to have a glühwein?

In America, we're missing a bunch of things. And when I write that, please don't take it the wrong way. I don't mean it in a combative way, nor do I mean it to say my love for America has decreased any. (Notice: my cultural difference shows when I state that my love, love being the key, for my country has not decreased)

I mean it to say that we're missing things. Often times it's not just that we don't have the culture of glühwein drinking or sekt drinking. It's that we don't have the culture of doing it and we don't have the words. We have our own words and ours are inferior. By far.

For glühwein we say "mulled wine" or "hot mulled wine" It doesn't do it. It doesn't carry the connotations of steaming into the cold air, of being held tightly by gloved hands as a measure against the cold. It doesn't look good on large heating/serving containers for vendors.
It doesn't work.

Sekt is sparkling wine. But sekt is good, sekt is worth drinking. Sparkling wine seems childish and a improper substitute for champagne. Which sekt is not. Because it's a matter of nomenclature and the Germans have it right and have some better drinks as a result.

I say to you, freezing in the cold on the slopes, freezing in the cold watching your kids game, freezing in the cold at some event, at some (god-awful) outdoors party, at some thing, think of glühwein. It's wonderful.
And think that it takes all of us, together, to bring glühwein and sekt into our culture, to properly propagate them. Because they're worth it. They really are.

Both images taken during my ski trip with the family in the alps

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Getting your angry on

I thought I'd post that picture, of one of the Communist statues in the post-Soviet statue park, outside of Budapest. Seen during my first visit to Budapest.

To the potatoes: Ferdinand degenerated during the latter-half of the day, after the parents had left (a little past 7) to go to a birthday party. We fought a little, I thought everything was OK. I asked him to start working on cleaning his room while I got ready to make a little something for dinner.
I came in and started working on cleaning his room, while he just sat there and moped. He had done very little whilst I was in the other room and had said he was done -- not that he was put-a-fork-in done but rather he'd completed his work.
He seemed to sour before my eyes. I think this happened:
He formed an idea in his head, started repeating it and then started believing it, until he fully did. He told me he was upset because he'd thought he'd got to do NO fun things the entire day -- that the whole day was consumed by un-fun things. He then proceeded to sulk and was pissy for the rest of the night. I think he even tried a mini hunger strike. He refused to eat more than one egg for dinner.
He proceeded to not talk to me for the rest of the night, at his dinner alone in his room, read in the room. I cooked dinner for myself, went upstairs and listened to Talk of the Nation. He came up around 8:10 and started to watch TV, not uttering a word to me. At nine, I asked him to go brush his teeth and get ready for bed. He turned off the TV, threw the remote down onto the chair and stomped down the stairs. He slammed the bathroom door. He came out after awhile (I was washing dishes) and slammed his door.
One should know: we'd play-fought for quite a bit, he'd talked with his mom and otherwise not done too many productive things for a large part of the day (he came home at 2:45 or so.) It was a huge struggle to get him to unpack and repack his backpack and he took a long, luxurious bath once he got home from soccer practice, at about 6:45.

Life is tough, isn't it?

I really think he worked himself into a froth. I think he wanted to be pissy and angry and frothed.

As William Goldman wrote for the Princess Bride movie:

"Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something."

To round it out, a picture of a house in Denmark. From the sailing trip with the Kretzschmar family.

Monday, November 2, 2009

Mustard -- a love story

I wish this post had some kind of better subject matter. But it doesn't. I'm like that. I'm that way. I could talk about Halloween, or notes on what happens when one over beats cookie dough (such as my au pair child did) or other seemingly more interesting things. But to me, they're are merely seemingly and never really.
Instead, I will write of mustard. That's right, mustard. Because I love the stuff. It might very well be hard-encoded into my genes to love mustard -- it may be a trait I pass down to my prospective children.
Mustard is to me what chocolate is to many other people. Yet, mustard is so much not-fattening. And so cheap! Which doesn't exactly bring me to in any other than a superficial way to my subject: Bautz'ner Mustard, or in the native language, Bautz'ner Senf. (Senf is mustard in German.)
It's a middle-spicy mustard, it's slightly pale in color but is not a French mustard. Nor is it the incredible Sierra Nevada Porter & Spicy Brown Mustard, the best mustard in the world. That I've tasted so far.
But the German mustard is delicious. It is incredible. It does create an addiction to Wiener Würstchen dunked in the mustard.
It's like crack, without the drugs, chemical dependency and an incredible taste. As seen in the photo above, the glass of mustard (for Europeans sell mustard [often times] in glassware that is meant to be reused -- in France mustard comes in the much more useful wine glasses) features the, or, Unser Sandmännchen -- Our (diminutive) Sandman. He's a feature of German TV, especially East German TV.
And he's not scary like the 3D talking piece of toast. Which is a nightmare for another day.